Crowfeet

Having made it through buttonholes and buttons, WILD moves us into decorative stitching. While machines today include a plethora of options for decorative stitching, in the 1920’s it was all done by hand. And while embroidery work is always an option no matter what the project, in tailoring, Mary Brooks Picken pulls out three specific stitches. The first of these is Crowfeet.

Crowfeet is based on a triangle, so step one is make a triangle, approximately 3/4” on a side.

Triangle!

Triangle!

Mine is in pen so it’s easy to see for the camera. If I were making this on an actual garment, I would mark it with chalk so it’s easy to remove the underlying markings. Also for ease I have marked each point as A, B, C. The first stitch is to bring the needle up at point A. When starting the project, the line between AC should be toward you so that point B is at the top of the piece.

Point B at the Apex

Point B at the Apex

You want to pull the needle through as a top stitch at point B, catching just the tiniest piece of fabric in that stitch. Once done with the stitch, rotate the piece so that the AB line is now toward you with point C at the Apex.

Rotate piece so AB line is toward you, C is at Apex

Rotate piece so AB line is toward you, C is at Apex

Repeat the tiny stitch at point C and rotate piece again so that A is at the Apex and line BC is now toward you. This is the point that I messed up during the video. Failing to rotate so that point A is now at the top means in the video, my needle is entering the fabric at the wrong point for the A Apex stitch. I still managed to fake it and my stitch in the video came out fine, but rotating the piece is easier in the end.

BC toward you, A at Apex

BC toward you, A at Apex

Each stitch you will rotate the piece so that the stitch location is at the Apex of the triangle. Each subsequent stitch will be a little closer to the center of the triangle, so that each crossover stitch pulls the whole in to the center, creating a foot.

Still not perfect, but I got the gist.

Still not perfect, but I got the gist.

Now, this is still by no means perfect. With any skill, practice makes perfect, so my next step would be to make ANOTHER crowfoot. My next step is actually to get better at making triangles. But, one stitch at a time will get me to perfection.