Skirt Sloper

Here it is. I managed to pin my self down long enough to make the pattern. Step one is basically a giant rectangle. The measurement chart does not provide a skirt length, so I set my length at 24”, which is approximately my waist to knee length. Start by drawing your skirt length down the center of your pattern paper. The front and back pieces are drawn off of this line. Your hip depth is measurement 25 from the chart. Once you mark this point, we construct the back skirt piece first.

The next measurement is the back hip arc, measurement 23 plus ease. Square out from A line to D, from point C, and from point B, then connect the dots at pints D, E, and F. Repeat all steps on the other side of the A to B line creating the “front” rectangle, marking the points as H, I, and J. G is up from the C-E line using the BACK hip depth measurement, number 25.

My pattern 1 compared to Figure 1

My pattern 1 compared to Figure 1

Next, we figure out dart placement. Start by determining where the hip points are, both determined as measurement 19. The back hip point is the back waist arc (19), plus ease, plus dart intake. I used the standard dart intake, but the book does include personal intake for custom fitting. Repeat all steps on the front half of the pattern, including ease and dart intakes, either standard or personal.

My pattern 2 with Figure 2

My pattern 2 with Figure 2

Step 3 is all the curves. The hip curve is determined by your side hip depth, measurement 26. Using that measurement and your hip curve rule, curve the measurement out from your A to C line to points K and M on either side. Then, using that same curve rule, connect point G on the back skirt piece to the top of the curve rule, now marked point P. Repeat on front of pattern, connecting dots from point H to top of hip curve, now marked point Q.

My pattern 3 and figure 3

My pattern 3 and figure 3

Finally, complete your darts. Back darts have a depth of 5 1/2 inches, front darts have a depth of 3 1/2 inches. Find the center point of each dart, draw a line at the appropriate depth, and connect the legs of each dart to the center line.

My pattern 4 and figure 4

My pattern 4 and figure 4

And that’s it. I will admit to being a little worried that my pattern only has a passing resemblance to the book image. But, there is only one way to determine how I did: Make up the pattern and see how it fits. But that is Monday’s post.