Posts tagged sewing is NOT hard
Standard Measurement Chart

Well, it can be a bit startling to look at a measurement chart and go WAIT!  I cannot possibly be a size 10!  When I shop at the store I’m a size 4!  Trust me—make the size 10.  Vanity sizing means nothing if the clothes you make are too small to wear.  Now, something else to notice about the vanity sizing chart:

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Dressmaker Measurements

his will remain a challenge throughout pattern making and fitting, as no matter what dressmaker dummy you buy, unless it is a very high end custom form, the dressmaker dummy is rarely set to account for postural anomalies. Get comfortable with a camera, as actually wearing the item and checking for fit in a picture is the best way to make adjustments for us bent b*tches.

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Fools Rush In

So, having received my first shipment, and knowing that making garments of my product was one of the easiest ways to market my silk, I jumped in, eyes shut, and picked my pattern.  Let me say, it was foolish to wait so long.  Facebook pages and sewing groups have people still commenting on silk's delicacy, and how hard silk is to work with.  Nope on delicacy.  

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UFO Shame Spiral

And then there is me.  If I put down an object, it may be decades before I pick it up again to finish it.  This is not a joke. A literal decade may pass before I complete the item.  I have an entire Box of Shame of UFOs that I sort of look at and realize I should just re-cut them in to quilting squares. 

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Buttons!

Woman’s Institute Library of Dressmaking dedicates very little time to what was, at the time of publishing, the MAJOR closing mechanism for garments. WILD was initially published in 1926, the zipper was not widely used in fashion until the late 1930’s, which makes the button important from a 1920’s seamstress perspective.

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Cartridge Pleating

Run two or more rows of evenly spaced basting stitches parallel to each other, then pull them up to create the gather before hand stitching them to the waistband. Which sounds an awful lot like: "Two rows of tightly-sewn stitches hold these pleats in place, and then the bodice is connected to the upper stitched line."  That description is from a book called Traditional Korean Costume, and is describing a men's coat excavated from the tomb of Yi Hwang.

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Simulated Buttonholes

The next buttonhole in the Woman's Institute Library of Dressmaking isn't even a buttonhole. It's a fake buttonhole. Mary Brooks Pickens calls it simulated, but that's just 1920's slang for fake. Once more, the picture in the book turned out way better than mine, but it's all in the name of learning. So here it is: How to Make a Simulated (fake) Buttonhole.

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