Posts tagged sewing with silk
Intro: The Stand Pocket

The stand pocket is where WILD starts the chapter on pockets. And the directions start out contradictory, saying that “as a rule” stand pockets are found on jacket breasts, but then immediately Mary Brooks Pickens talks about stand pockets on skirts too.

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The One Hour Dress

I am deviating a bit from WILD today to bring you The One Hour Dress. Mary Brooks Pickens, author of The Women’s Institute Library for Dressmaking ALSO created three booklets called The One Hour Dress, with each booklet containing multiple variations and how-to’s on the cut and construction to get different garments from the same basic principle, all of which could be constructed in one hour. And she used to demonstrate this one hour constructions live at carnivals and shopping centers, to show how easy it was to construct a new frock in a limited amount of time.

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Sewing Lightweight Fabrics

The biggest challenge with lightweight fabrics is that it is too easy for the needle to push the fabric down under the throat plate. And if this happens, you have to stop everything and remove the throat plate, or risk tearing the fabric. However, there is a VERY simple fix to this.

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Pongee

Pongee, like most silks, originates from China. The word even is very Chinese, the etymology of which is penchi, meaning woven at home, or home loom (Fairchilds, p. 474). This is another plain woven silk, but rougher, with a homespun feel to it, versus the fineness of China Silk. Fairchild’s also reports that this is woven in the gum. I hazard to guess what this means as no specific definition is given, but my supposition is that the silk is only mildly washed or not washed at all, prior to weaving. This supposition is supported by the crisp hand of Pongee silk.

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Matelasse

the original Matelasse was a thicker, quilted fabric, I believe most commonly seen in petticoats and waistcoats.  But with the advent of the Jacquard loom, the quilting has dropped off and it’s all done with extra crepe yarns set at different tensions.  Once off the loom, the fabric is washed, causing the crepe yarns to shrink.  This in turn causes the regular yarns to pull and pucker, giving this faux-quilted effect. 

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