Posts tagged silk fabric
Pongee

Pongee, like most silks, originates from China. The word even is very Chinese, the etymology of which is penchi, meaning woven at home, or home loom (Fairchilds, p. 474). This is another plain woven silk, but rougher, with a homespun feel to it, versus the fineness of China Silk. Fairchild’s also reports that this is woven in the gum. I hazard to guess what this means as no specific definition is given, but my supposition is that the silk is only mildly washed or not washed at all, prior to weaving. This supposition is supported by the crisp hand of Pongee silk.

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Matelasse

the original Matelasse was a thicker, quilted fabric, I believe most commonly seen in petticoats and waistcoats.  But with the advent of the Jacquard loom, the quilting has dropped off and it’s all done with extra crepe yarns set at different tensions.  Once off the loom, the fabric is washed, causing the crepe yarns to shrink.  This in turn causes the regular yarns to pull and pucker, giving this faux-quilted effect. 

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Watermelon Juice

This was one of those accidental stains. I deliberately stained some Irish Shamrock habotai with spray adhesive, which I am still working on removing (stupid glue). But, due to reasons having to do with family and life, I currently have two teenagers living with me. Last Monday, they went to a party and returned with half a watermelon in a garbage bag. The watermelon was still good at that time so after sharing some with the happy parrots (those frequently heard in the background of our videos), the watermelon was left on the counter. For a week. In the garbage bag.

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Georgette

Georgette is another crepe fabric, and is created with the alternating Z and S twist threads on both the warp and the weft threads. The Z and S twists are given very hard twist, as many as 50 to 90 turns per inch, which makes the filament fairly rigid. However, due to this hard twist, the fabric feels almost grainy and dry.

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Trash it Tuesday--File Not Found

So we know silk was cultivated for weaving as early as 3,000 BCE, and not just from legend. But I want to know more. Inspired to dig deeper by the lectures of Elizabeth Wayland Barber, I’m digging in to the research. And thanks to a lecture by Kenna Libes, I have a whole host of new resources to dig through in my quest for knowledge. And with the world’s knowledge available, all you have to do is dig.

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Faille

Faille is one of many rib weaves, meaning the fabric itself has a texture due to the appearance of vertical or horizontal ribs as part of the weaving. Rib weave when done as Faille is a plain woven fabric, so one over one under. In Faille, the ribs are usually horizontal. So what causes the ribs? Ribbing is caused when either the warp or the weft threads are thicker than the cross weave.

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Week 6: The Artist's Way

Recognizing that success is not a bad thing is good. Knowing that money, having money, is not a bad thing, is GOOD. But even better, rather than turning this in to a do this to get money section, Cameron has you explore various aspects of how you personally feel about and interact with money. Then the tasks for the week relate to recognizing OTHER abundance as found in nature. Learning to see and appreciate the natural abundance that surrounds you is the real lesson for the week.

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The Event So Far

Costume College starts with registration and a Thursday night pool party where everyone starts the mutual admiration society (seriously…that’s not sarcasm….it’s awesome how many high fives and good jobs I heard flying around). It’s truly inspiring how supportive everyone is of everyone’s costuming, regardless of ability or effort (that is aimed solely at me…I was seriously not even trying last night and still got compliments.)

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