Posts tagged what's in a weave
Georgette

Georgette is another crepe fabric, and is created with the alternating Z and S twist threads on both the warp and the weft threads. The Z and S twists are given very hard twist, as many as 50 to 90 turns per inch, which makes the filament fairly rigid. However, due to this hard twist, the fabric feels almost grainy and dry.

Read More
Faille

Faille is one of many rib weaves, meaning the fabric itself has a texture due to the appearance of vertical or horizontal ribs as part of the weaving. Rib weave when done as Faille is a plain woven fabric, so one over one under. In Faille, the ribs are usually horizontal. So what causes the ribs? Ribbing is caused when either the warp or the weft threads are thicker than the cross weave.

Read More
That's a Moire

But if China did not invent this technique, and the earliest mangle was located in Norway, than most likely moire was first linen, possibly wool, with silk being discovered by a foolhardy chamber maid who was probably beaten for putting the very expensive silk through a mangle.  Yeah the effect was cool, but what the hell!

Read More
In Search of Duchess Satin

Even more alarming, was when Vogue Fabrics provided that "Duchess Satin is a soft, full bodied, polyester satin used in evening wear and special occasion garments."  Or NY Fashion Center provided a silk/nylon blend for $111.99.  One Hundred Eleven Dollars!  It's not even 100% silk!  And yet I know that 100% silk duchess satin exists because it was among the samples sent to me from my manufacturers.  Burn tests confirm, 100%silk.  In my searches, I saw one well known website (not cited here for discretion) that said duchess satin was silk satin, with no further disclaimer.

Read More
Silk Satin

Satin, to no one’s surprise, originated in China, in a town originally named Zaytoun, later Canton, now Guangzhou. Guangzhou is still a MAJOR textile production area of China. If you search Ali Baba for textiles, a solid chunk of the return hits originate in Guangzhou. It is from medieval Zaytoun that Europe eventually became acquainted with Silk Satin, as Zaytoun, much like it’s modern descendant Guangzhou, was a major shipping port, and fabric was exported from there, by ship and by land along the legendary Silk Road. So what is Silk Satin?

Read More
Dupioni--Friend or Foe?

All the variations of spelling mean the same thing--Double.  Doupioni Silk threads are spun from silk cocoons that were spun too close together.  This filament is usually from cultivated silk due to overcrowding.  In the wild, silk worms have lots of room to spread out, so double cocoons rarely happen.  When the filaments are un-spun from the cocoons, there are thicker slubs where the cocoons crossed over.

Read More
Crepe Back Satin

"Raw silk yarn made of two or more twisted singles that are then doubled and twisted in the reverse direction on the ply."  Now, to explain that.  Four filament threads are laid out, two by two.  Two are spun together with an s-twist, the other two are also spun together with an s-twist.  Then those new threads are spun together on a z-twist.

Read More
Taffeta--From the Persian

As silk made it's way along the silk road and down in to Persia, the Persian's added their own twist.  Literally.  Taffeta is from the Persian word Taftah, meaning "twisted woven," Taffeta was first woven in the Third Century in Persia (p. 68, Parker).  Taffeta is a smooth, tightly woven, plain weave fabric, created by adding additional twist to the threads during weaving.

Read More